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~ Faery Music ~

Gothic & Ethereal

  | Alternative | Ambient | Celtic | Classical | Gothic/Ethereal | Traditional Folk |

 

You can listen to these albums by clicking on the links.

 

Dead Can Dance

Lisa Gerrard sings so beautifully she is like a Lady of Faery. Their music conjures up images of distant times and exotic places. Lisa also has solo albums, The Mirror Pool and Duality. Click above to see a listing of their albums and listen to them.

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Dead Can Dance

This was their first album. It sounds much more traditionally gothic than there later albums.

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Spleen and Ideal

This album is much more classical and medieval sounding than their first album.

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Within the Realm of a Dying Sun

This album continues in the medieval and classical course. It is tragic and beautiful. Lisa's vocals are angelic.

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Serpent's Egg

This album has an almost monastic sound to it, like the chanting in medieval monasteries and abbeys. Exquisitely beautiful vocals by Lisa Gerard.

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Toward the Within

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Into the Labyrinth

Amazon.com: Their goth-sounding name and dour visual image aside, the prolific duo of Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard produce wildly eclectic but utterly unique music. Their painstakingly crafted albums encompass numerous arcane genres, from European classical music to ancient Celtic and Middle Eastern folk styles, often employing authentic antique instruments to achieve their ambitious, emotive soundscapes. The 1993 effort Into the Labyrinth found Dead Can Dance mixing their medieval leanings with more exotic Eastern influences on "Saldek" and "Yulunga," while exploring Celtic balladry on the traditional "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" and theatrical songcraft in their interpretation of Bertolt Brecht's "How Fortunate Is the Man with None." --Scott Schinder

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Aion

Amazon.com: Long before No Doubt brought back ska and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy resurrected swing, Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry were making music that recalled an earlier time. How early? Try the Renaissance. Everything old--really old--is new again on Aion, the band's fifth and arguably finest album. Like DCD's other discs, Aion revolves around the interplay between Gerrard's soaring glossolalia and Perry's baritone crooning. A range of styles are explored, from the polyphonic choral heights of "The Arrival and the Reunion" to the smooth balladry of "Fortune Presents Gifts Not According to the Book" to the Middle Eastern sensuality of "Radharc." Other standout tracks include the playful "Saltarello," a traditional 14th-century instrumental dance piece, and "As the Bell Rings the Maypole Spins," a strikingly melodic song carried by bagpipes and Gerrard's angelic voice. --Steve Landau

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  Spiritchaser

This album breaks some new ground for them as they sound much more tribal on this album.

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Wake: Best of Dead Can Dance

If you can't afford the above albums this album combines some of their best work.


Baraka (1994) VHS
Baraka (1994) DVD

Featuring the music of Dead Can Dance, this video tells the story of humanity's relationship with nature and other human beings. It shows our modern mechanistic way of life and the impact it is having on the environment. The cinematography is beautiful, the scenes of nature are spectacular.. This is a very powerful and moving video.

Lisa Gerrard

Lisa Gerrard has two of her own solo albums which are lovely.

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The Mirror Pool

Amazon.com The Dead Can Dance chanteuse ditches her partner, Brendan Perry, for this solo outing. Mixing middle-eastern drones, Balkan stringed instruments, Chinese percussion, and the European classical tradition, it's a singularly beautiful and mesmerizing album that occupies a genre all of its own. File next to Chant and Jan Garbarek, and be sure to alert progressive-minded classical buffs. --Jeff Bateman

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Duality

Amazon.com Duality is at once sacred and playful. It is both dark and light, organic and refined, masculine and feminine. Dead Can Dance's Lisa Gerrard partners with Pieter Bourke, formerly of Aussie band Eden, to create this compositional dance of partnership that is classical, ancient, and thoroughly modern. Gerrard's voice is multitracked at times, conjuring a cathedral choir and the droning chants of monks. Drums and synth snake from desert to brilliant stormy sky to shaking earth and the bodies that inhabit those spaces. There are lush multiple layers of strings, bagpipe drone, and, quite literally, the laughter of children. The vocals sans "real" words and multicultural instrumentation will be familiar to Dead Can Dance listeners. Yet there is something more exclusive, more womblike about the music of Bourke and Gerrard; rather than two distinct bodies making music, like mother and in utero child sharing blood and breath, they are mutually dependent. --Paige La Grone

 

  | Alternative | Ambient | Celtic | Classical | Gothic/Ethereal | Traditional Folk |
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